2016 MRS Fall Meeting

Nov 27, 2016 ‐ Dec 1, 2016


The 2016 MRS Fall Meeting was held in Boston, Massachusetts from November 27 – December 2, 2016.  Recorded sessions include tutorial sessions, keynote talks and highlights from technical session presentations.


Sessions

Materials Science of Quantum Computing, Part 1

Nov 27, 2016 8:30am ‐ Nov 27, 2016 12:00pm

Identification: Tutorial EM1.1

Quantum computing promises to revolutionize information technology as we know it by changing the physical nature of the fundamental unit of information. However, the physical limitations to creating a quantum computer originate in our ability to manipulate and control the basic materials that comprise quantum computing devices. The tutorial provides an introduction to the relevant applied physics and the related material structures needed to create elementary quantum computing devices.


Part one of this tutorial focuses on targeted topics of quantum mechanics and solid-state physics as applicable to gate-based fault-tolerant quantum computing including some of the underlying physics of qubits such as:
- DiVincenzo criteria for quantum computing
- Representation of quantum states on the Bloch sphere
- Encoding quantum information onto spin and pseudo-spin states
- Magnetic resonant spectroscopy as related to qubit manipulation
- Measurements of lifetime and decoherence

Speaker(s):

The Fundamentals, Advanced Fabrication Approaches, and Novel Applications of Functional Plasmonics, Part 1: Overview of the Physics and Development of Plasmonics

Nov 27, 2016 8:30am ‐ Nov 27, 2016 12:00pm

Identification: Tutorial EM7.1

Following fast development in several decades, plasmonics has stepped into a new horizon, where not only the intriguing optical properties of plasmonic structures and systems matter but also their functionalities, especially promising applications in different spectral regimes are of paramount importance. A better understanding of the profound properties from the molecular to submicron level opens a new pathway to designing functional plasmonic materials and devices.

This tutorial will focus on both the fundamentals and applications of functional plasmonics from the visible to the microwave regime.

Alù will discuss the most recent theoretical and experimental results, including plasmonic nanostructures and metasurfaces to control wave propagation, scattering, and radiation, large nonreciprocal responses without magnetic bias, active meta-atoms, and metasurfaces. Physical insights into these exotic phenomena, new devices based on these concepts, and their impact on technology will be discussed during the talk. He will also outline the exciting venues for functional devices in the microwave and optical regime.

Speaker(s):

Materials Science of Quantum Computing, Part 2

Nov 27, 2016 8:30am ‐ Nov 27, 2016 12:00pm

Identification: Tutorial EM1.2

Quantum computing promises to revolutionize information technology as we know it by changing the physical nature of the fundamental unit of information. However, the physical limitations to creating a quantum computer originate in our ability to manipulate and control the basic materials that comprise quantum computing devices. The tutorial provides an introduction to the relevant applied physics and the related material structures needed to create elementary quantum computing devices.
Part two of the tutorial will explore connections to actual material structures, their design, selection criteria, and means of fabrication for existing quantum information devices including:


- Ion trap qubits
- Silicon germanium donor qubits
- Silicon germanium quantum dot qubits
- Superconducting quantum circuit qubits


For each technology, relationships between decoherence measurements, interactions of the quantum state with materials and defects, and current understanding of the microscopic origins of materials defects will be presented.

Speaker(s):

The Fundamentals, Advanced Fabrication Approaches, and Novel Applications of Functional Plasmonics, Part 2: Advanced Top-Down Fabrications and Applications of Functional Plasmonics in the Near-Infrared and Visible Regimes

Nov 27, 2016 8:30am ‐ Nov 27, 2016 12:00pm

Identification: Tutorial EM7.2

Following fast development in several decades, plasmonics has stepped into a new horizon, where not only the intriguing optical properties of plasmonic structures and systems matter but also their functionalities, especially promising applications in different spectral regimes are of paramount importance. A better understanding of the profound properties from the molecular to submicron level opens a new pathway to designing functional plasmonic materials and devices.


This tutorial will focus on both the fundamentals and applications of functional plasmonics from the visible to the microwave regime.


Giessen will discuss advanced top-down fabrications and applications of functional plasmonics in the near-infrared and visible regimes, which provide a promising path to practicality. Complex plasmonic structures allow for tailoring resonances and functionality. Gold and silver with atomically flat surfaces and single crystalline atomic arrangements represent ultimate material quality. Hybrid materials enable chiral as well as nonreciprocal responses. Active switching is enabled by phase change materials as well as metal-¬to-¬insulator transitions. New materials for plasmonics include Yttrium and its hydrides, refractory materials such as TiN, as well as the highly reactive magnesium, whose particle plasmons can be switched on and off by hydrogen and oxygen. Novel fabrication methods such as two-photon femtosecond direct laser writing, colloidal-etching lithography and interference lithography allow for low-cost and large-area fabrication of functional plasmonic devices.

Speaker(s):

The Fundamentals, Advanced Fabrication Approaches, and Novel Applications of Functional Plasmonics, Part 3: Advanced Bottom-Up Fabrications using DNA Nanotechnology for Functional Plasmonics in the Visible Regime

Nov 27, 2016 8:30am ‐ Nov 27, 2016 12:00pm

Identification: Tutorial EM7.3

Following fast development in several decades, plasmonics has stepped into a new horizon, where not only the intriguing optical properties of plasmonic structures and systems matter but also their functionalities, especially promising applications in different spectral regimes are of paramount importance. A better understanding of the profound properties from the molecular to submicron level opens a new pathway to designing functional plasmonic materials and devices.


This tutorial will focus on both the fundamentals and applications of functional plasmonics from the visible to the microwave regime.


Gang will provide insights into the DNA-driven assembly of optically active nano-objects into well-defined architectures: ideas, methods, and realizations. Approaches based on self-assembly offer tremendous advantages in nanomaterial fabrication and address tasks that are intrinsically difficult for conventional fabrication methods. He will present DNA assembly of plasmonic clusters and extended arrays from nanoscale components of multiple types driven by DNA recognition, chain effects and geometrical factors. Based on the expertise in assembly, optical and mechanical effects in plasmonic nanosystems can be controlled well and this allows for rationalizing all aspects of nanomaterial fabrication.

Speaker(s):

Grid-Scale Energy Storage: Materials, Manufacturing, and Systems Aspects, Part 1: Energy Storage and Future Grid

Nov 27, 2016 1:00pm ‐ Nov 27, 2016 5:00pm

Identification: Tutorial ES1.1

The primary aim of this tutorial is to present an overview of grid storage technology, especially those aspects of materials R&D that are relevant to the materials science community. The instructors will offer insights into the manufacturing aspects of large-scale electrochemical energy storage and the development of commercial grid-class energy storage systems.


The instructor will present an overview of the electric grid infrastructure and the importance of the energy storage for the future grid. There will be a discussion of the current role of the energy storage in the grid and the impediments to large-scale deployment and requirements for large-scale adaption of electrochemical batteries. Emphasizing materials for large scale electrochemical energy storage, the tutorial will review active materials and used mature battery technologies such as lithium-ion, advanced lead acid, and sodium sulfur, followed by a discussion of the state-of-the-art research to improve these battery technologies. New materials and battery technologies under development, including advanced redox flow, Na-ion, Li-S, and alkaline batteries will be reviewed.

Speaker(s):

Grid-Scale Energy Storage: Materials, Manufacturing, and Systems Aspects, Part 2: Manufacturing of Grid-class Electrochemical Batteries-Comparative Analysis for Various Chemistries

Nov 27, 2016 1:00pm ‐ Nov 27, 2016 5:00pm

Identification: Tutorial ES1.2

The primary aim of this tutorial is to present an overview of grid storage technology, especially those aspects of materials R&D that are relevant to the materials science community. The instructors will offer insights into the manufacturing aspects of large-scale electrochemical energy storage and the development of commercial grid-class energy storage systems.


Grid-scale applications of batteries require low-cost materials and manufacturing processes that are readily scalable for high-volume production. The instructors will present a comparative analysis of the manufacturing process for various battery technologies and discuss opportunities for improvement through new materials and process R&D.

Speaker(s):

Grid-Scale Energy Storage: Materials, Manufacturing, and Systems Aspects, Part 4: Grid Integration

Nov 27, 2016 1:00pm ‐ Nov 27, 2016 5:00pm

Identification: Tutorial ES1.4

The primary aim of this tutorial is to present an overview of grid storage technology, especially those aspects of materials R&D that are relevant to the materials science community. The instructors will offer insights into the manufacturing aspects of large-scale electrochemical energy storage and the development of commercial grid-class energy storage systems.


The instructor will present examples of large-scale grid storage implementation around the world, including a discussion of operational details, with a review of data from some large demonstration systems.

Speaker(s):

Grid-Scale Energy Storage: Materials, Manufacturing, and Systems Aspects, Part 3: Systems and Engineering Aspects including Safety and Reliability

Nov 27, 2016 1:00pm ‐ Nov 27, 2016 5:00pm

Identification: Tutorial ES1.3

The primary aim of this tutorial is to present an overview of grid storage technology, especially those aspects of materials R&D that are relevant to the materials science community. The instructors will offer insights into the manufacturing aspects of large-scale electrochemical energy storage and the development of commercial grid-class energy storage systems.


The process of making batteries into energy storage requires a significant level of systems integration including packaging, thermal management systems, power electronics and power conversion systems, and control electronics. The system and engineering aspects represent a significant cost and component, and system-level integration continues to present significant opportunities for further research. Unlike batteries for consumer electronics and battery packs for electric vehicles, the scale and complexity of large stationary applications in the electric grid impose a complex set of requirements on the safety and reliability of grid-scale energy storage systems. The instructors will review the fundamental safety aspects of grid energy storage and how this safety is connected to the electrochemistry of materials, cell-level interactions, packaging and thermal management at the cell and system level, and the overall engineering and control architecture of large-scale energy storage systems.

Speaker(s):

Memristive Materials and Neuromorphic Devices, Part 1

Nov 27, 2016 1:30pm ‐ Nov 27, 2016 5:30pm

Identification: Tutorial EM10.1

Due to the technological limitation of flash memory, a significant number of new nonvolatile memories are now being proposed. The tutorial covers the fundamental physics behind the emerging nonvolatile memories. Resistive switching memory (ReRAM) technologies (based on non-phase change materials) and its application will be the focus of this tutorial. Presentations by two leading researchers will cover the fundamental background of devices.


Themis Prodromakis will review the new materials and the physical properties required for this type of memory cells. The link between the resistance-switching mechanisms and the realization of memristor will be included in this segment, along with the state of the art of this technology.

Speaker(s):