OnDemand Webinar Series


Presentations: 3


Sessions

Green Cards for Scientific Researchers: How to Win Your EB-1/NIW Case!


Learn everything you need to know about the U.S. immigration system and how to maximize your chances of winning a green card in the EB-1/NIW categories.

Speaker bio: Brian Getson is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Law School with 20 years of experience. He is a leading U.S. immigration lawyer who represents scientific researchers in applying for green cards and leads his immigration law firm based in Philadelphia. Mr. Getson has given presentations on "Green Cards for Scientific Researchers" at numerous major scientific conferences, the Wistar Institute, and at Universities. Mr. Getson often provides a money back guarantee to qualified applicants giving clients confidence that they will get results. See his website, researchergreencard.com for more information.

EVENT SPONSORED AND PRESENTED BY:

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Speaker(s):
Free

Atomic Layer Deposition for Emerging Thin-film Materials and Applications


This webinar was presented in conjunction with the Journal of Materials Research Focus Issue on Atomic Layer Deposition for Emerging Thin-film Materials and Applications. The webinar featured three presentations from authors from the Focus Issue, and each talk was followed by an interactive Q&A session with those authors.

Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a powerful and elegant technique for depositing atomically controllable thin film materials. ALD proceeds with a unique growth mechanism relying on alternately sequential surface-controlled self-saturation reactions, which enables the atomic-scale layer-by-layer deposition of the uniformly conformal films over virtually any topologies.

Since the 2000s, ALD has greatly widened its variety of applications from semiconductors to catalysis, biomedicine, gas sensing, anti-corrosion coating, clean-energy technologies (batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, solar cells, etc.), and nano- and micro-electromechanical systems (N/MEMS). The characteristic merits of ALD include not only its superior controllability over film thickness, composition, and crystallinity, but also its unique capability for constructing conformal thin-film coatings on complex structures. These merits underlie the fast expansion of ALD into new areas over the past decades, such as metal-organic frameworks, two-dimensional layered materials, single-atom catalysis, solid-state batteries, and so forth.

Talk Presentations: 

  • Encapsulation of Organic and Nanocrystal LEDs via Atomic Layer Deposition
    Rong Chen, Huazhong University of Science and Technology
    Talk begins at 7:57 
       
  • Atomic layer–deposited nanostructures and their applications in energy storage and sensing
    Yongfeng Mei, Fudan University
    Talk begins at 37:33
      
  • Nanoscale Al2O3 coating to stabilize selenium cathode for sodium–selenium batteries
    Jian Liu, University of British Columbia
    Talk begins at 1:03:42

Speaker(s): Host(s):
Free

Nanoscale Tomography Using X-rays and Electrons


Three-dimensional (3D) tomographic imaging, using x-rays or electrons, of the structural, chemical, and physical properties of a material provides key knowledge that links the structure of a material to its processing, which is central to studies across a broad spectrum of materials. For decades, tomography using x-rays or electrons has proven to be an essential 3D characterization tool. In recent years, advances in technology have enabled new imaging capabilities at the nanometer or atomic scale for 3D reconstruction.

The April 2020 issue of MRS Bulletin discusses developments, techniques, and future directions for 3D tomographic imaging. This webinar expanded upon and complemented the MRS Bulletin issue with talks from leading experts in the field. An interactive Q&A session followed each of the talks.

Talk Presentations:

  • High-dimensional and high-resolution x-ray tomography for energy materials science
    Yijin Liu, Stanford University
    Talk begins at 10:54 
       
  • Electron Tomography for Functional Nanomaterials
    Robert Hovden, University of Michigan
    Talk begins at 41:10
       
  • Atomic Electron Tomography: Adding New Dimensions to Pinpoint Single Atoms in Materials
    Jianwei (John) Miao, UCLA
    Talk begins at 1:11:33
       

Sponsored by American Elements

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Host(s): Speaker(s):
Free

A new, much faster approach to low-mobility Hall measurements


New technology now makes it possible to research low-mobility materials on a tabletop Hall measurement system without the use of AC field. Join this webinar and see a hands-on demonstration. Presented by Lake Shore Cryotronics.

Lake Shore Cryotronics logo - links to Lake Shore website

Speaker(s): Host(s):
Free

Can Materials Science Counter the COVID-19 Pandemic? A discussion with materials researchers at the frontlines of battling the coronavirus


Co-presented with SFB, the Society for Biomaterials

The spread of COVID-19 throughout the globe highlights the need for improved solutions in the fight against infectious diseases. As always, materials research plays an immense role in finding these solutions. Prevention and protection, diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines – materials science plays a key role in each of these key components.

In this live 90-minute panel discussion, we spoke with five researchers on the frontlines of this critical battle, applying biomaterials, nanotechnology, and other tools of materials research to accelerate a solution.

This webinar brought an overwhelming amount of questions, and we are continuing the conversation on LinkedIn @COVID-19 (Coronavirus) and Materials Science. We encourage you to join the group as we resume the discussion with materials researchers at the forefront of this battle.

Join the discussion on the COVID-19 and Materials Science LinkedIn group

Host: Kara Spiller, Drexel University and Chair of the Society for Biomaterials Immune Engineering Special Interest Group

Panelists:

  • Jared DeCoste, US Army CCDC Chemical Biological Center: Dr. DeCoste's research focuses on novel materials development for the remediation of toxic threats, specifically the development and engineering of materials into functional forms of personal protective equipment.

  • Keith Pardee, University of Toronto: Dr. Pardee and his group are pioneering in vitro devices to host cell-free synthetic gene networks for broad applications in sensing and human health. They have used this approach to create a sterile and abiotic platform for low-cost diagnostics for Ebola and Zika viruses, and have also created a platform for making vaccines in the field.

  • Ankur Singh, Cornell University:  Dr. Singh has strong expertise in the engineering of biomaterials-based platforms for cell and immune modulation, cell-biomaterial interactions, immune cell engineering, and vaccines. His lab focuses on engineering immune and therapeutic cells by integrating innovative materials and core concepts of cellular and molecular immunology.

  • Nguyễn T.K. Thanh, University College London:  Dr. Thanh leads a very dynamic group conducting cutting edge interdisciplinary and innovative research on the design and synthesis of magnetic and plasmonic nanomaterials for biomedical applications (e.g., treatment of cancer and diagnosis of infectious diseases).

  • Thomas Webster, Northeastern University: The primary focus of Dr. Webster’s group is the design, synthesis, and evaluation of nanomaterials for medical applications such as inhibiting bacteria growth, inflammation, and promoting tissue growth. His group also works to develop in situ sensors which can sense biological responses to medical devices.

Sponsored by GatanMilliporeSigma and Goodfellow

Gatan Ametek logo, links to Gatan website MilliporeSigma logo, links to their website

Goodfellow logo, links to the Goodfellow website

Host(s): Panelist(s):
Free

Metasurfaces for Flat OpticsMetasurfaces for Flat Optics

Preview Available

Metasurfaces for Flat Optics


Conventional optical components including lenses based on refraction suffer from functional degradation as the device size decreases as well as other limitations. Metasurfaces consisting of subwavelength optical antenna arrays have emerged as planar optical devices that can overcome many of the limitations of conventional lenses. Such metasurfaces enable many promising applications in lenses, holograms, and optical cloaks. These metasurfaces have been developed for their specific functionalities by exploiting new materials and design algorithms. Various optical properties such as amplitude, phase, and even frequency can be tuned by adjusting the physical shape of individual antennas and their arrangement.

The articles in the March issue of MRS Bulletin overview recent progress in and the state-of-the-art of metasurfaces and their novel applications in optics and photonics.

This webinar featured three talks from experts in the field. A Q&A session was held with each speaker at the conclusion of their talks.

Talk Presentations:

  • Metasurface optics for imaging applications
    Byoungho Lee, Seoul National University
    Talk begins at 10:16
       
  • Machine learning for nanophotonics
    Michael Mrejen, Tel Aviv University
    Talk begins at 41:38
       
  • Data driven methods for electromagnetics design
    Jonathan Fan, Stanford University
    (Q&A with Evan Wang, Stanford University)
    Talk begins at 1:10:05
       

Sponsored by American Elements

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Host(s): Speaker(s):
Free

New ceramic electrode materials for rechargeable lithium and sodium-ion batteries


Co-presented with ACerS, the American Ceramic Society

The rechargeable lithium-ion battery (LIB) is one of the key enablers of the modern digital age. With an unrivaled combination of portability and energy density, LIBs are ubiquitous in consumer electronics such as cell phones and laptops and are the leading energy storage candidate for the clean energy grid and the electrification of transportation. Nevertheless, the quest for LIB materials with higher energy density, improved safety and better sustainability continues remains a topic of great research interest.

This webinar will feature three talks from experts in the field covering various topics in state-of-the-art LIB research. A Q&A session will be held with each speaker at the conclusion of their talks.

Talk Presentations:

  • Defect and Interface Engineering of Ceramic Electrode Materials for Sodium Ion Batteries
    Claire Xiong, Boise State University
  • Molecular Precursor-Derived Ceramics as Li-Ion Battery Anodes
    Gurpreet Singh, Kansas State University
  • Leverage Reversible Chemistry for Sustainable Energy Storage
    Zheng Chen, The University of California, San Diego

Host(s): Speaker(s):
Standard: Free

Advanced Materials for Transient Electronic Devices


Transient electronics, that can disappear, dissolve, or degrade in a controlled manner over time, has been attracting significant attention as a new and emerging technology. Transient electronics has unique applications, such as bioresorbable medical devices that can provide short-/medium-term diagnosis and treatment without removal surgery, environmentally friendly devices that can physically decompose within a specific timeframe and produce no waste, and self-destructing devices for non-recoverable IT and military security systems.

The February, 2020 issue of MRS Bulletin highlighted recent progress in transient electronics, focusing on materials aspects, including characterization, fabrication, and applications. This webinar featured three talks from well-known experts in the field. A Q&A session was held with each speaker at the conclusion of their talks.

Talk Presentations:

  • Inorganic Materials for Transient Electronics in Biomedical Applications
    John A. Rogers, Northwestern University
    Talk begins at 11:19
       
  • Energy Materials for Transient Power Sources
    Lan Yin, Tsinghua University
    Talk begins at 48:35
       
  • Material Strategies for On-Demand Smart Transient Electronics
    Yongfeng Mei, Fudan University
    Talk begins at 1:18:36
       

Sponsored by American Elements

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Speaker(s): Host(s):
Free

Cryogenic Electron Microscopy in Materials Science


Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy is simply transmission electron microscopy conducted on specimens that are cooled in the microscope. The ability to probe chemistry, structure, and bonding on the atomic scale in the temperature range from a few Kelvin to room temperature in structural and functional materials in a variable temperature transmission electron microscope is an intriguing prospect that will open up many new areas of materials research. The articles in the December 2019 issue of MRS Bulletin explore the current capabilities, future developments, and opportunities for cryogenic electron microscopy in materials science.

This webinar complemented the December 2019 issue of MRS Bulletin and featured talks from experts in the field. A Q&A session was held with each speaker at the conclusion of their talks.

Talk Presentations:

  • Soft matter and nanomaterials characterization by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy
    John Daniel Watt, Los Alamos National Laboratory
    Talk begins at 11:45
      
  • Cryogenic Specimens for Nanoscale Characterization of Solid-Liquid Interfaces
    Michael Zachman, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
    Talk begins at 46:36
       

Sponsored by American Elements

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Host(s): Speaker(s):
Free

Materials for Hot-Carrier Chemistry


The January, 2020 issue of MRS Bulletin examines the generation and relaxation of hot electrons in typical nanoparticle systems and the flow of hot electrons across the surfaces of the nanoparticles. The promise of hot-electron chemistry (and the complementary hot-hole chemistry) is supported by its application in many important reactions, including CO2 reduction, water splitting, hydrogenation, and coupling reactions, highlighting its great potential in achieving high energy-conversion efficiency and product selectivity.

This webinar featured three talks from experts in the field. A Q&A session was held with each speaker at the conclusion of their talks.

Talk presentations:

  • Nanodiode-based hot electrons: Influence on surface chemistry amd catalytic reactions
    Jeong Young Park, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
    Talk begins at 10:37
       
  • Plasmonic Metal–Semiconductor Heterostructures for Hot-Electron-Driven Photochemistry
    Jiawei Huang, University of Florida
    Talk begins at 49:28
       
  • Hot-Carrier Dynamics in Catalysis
    Jonathan Foley, William Paterson University
    Talk begins at 1:12:48
         

Sponsored by American Elements

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Host(s): Speaker(s):
Free
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