OnDemand Webinar Series


Presentations: 3


Sessions

System Integration of Functionalized Natural Materials


Speaker(s):

Materials Enabling Nanofluidic Flow Enhancement


Materials that enable nanofluidic systems show unusually high mass fluxes and flow rates in many cases, for example, in the case of water molecules coursing through a carbon nanotube. There are several examples of such flow enhancement in nanochannels. As new one-dimensional and two-dimensional nanomaterials are synthesized, a deeper understanding of the nanoscale transport physics is needed, particularly in the relationship between material properties and flow behavior, for nanofluidics applications of these materials. The April 2017 issue of MRS Bulletin describes the state of the art in materials development and characterization in nanofluidic flow. This webinar will complement the articles in the April issue of MRS Bulletin.

Talks:
 

  • Flow Enhancement in Carbon Nanotube
Davide Mattia | University of Bath
     
    • Ultra-Breathable Carbon Nanotube Pores
    Francesco Fornasiero | Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

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      Glass CeramicsGlass Ceramics

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      Glass Ceramics


      The articles in the March, 2017 issue of MRS Bulletin highlight property combinations relevant to very distinct applications of glass-ceramics. There are several overarching themes in common, including the proper selection of bulk composition to allow for crystallization of desired phases. These crystalline phases are, in turn, chosen for one or more specific attributes. Such attributes include greater chemical durability than the precursor glass; superior mechanical toughness; a high resistance to radiation damage; sites and structures within a crystalline framework with advantageous properties for “active” functions (e.g., luminescence and ionic diffusion); and a lack of a center-of-symmetry, thereby allowing properties forbidden to glass and many crystals (e.g., piezoelectricity and the electro-optic effect). These innovative applications of glass-ceramics owe their importance and continuing interest to hard-to-combine properties. The talks in this webinar expand on the content presented in the MRS Bulletin.

      Talks:
       

      • Glass Ceramics – Glorious Past and Bright Future!
      Edgar Dutra Zanotto | Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Brazil
         
        • Glass Ceramics for Nuclear Waste Immobilization
        John McCloy | Washington State University

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          Speaker(s):

          Stretchable and Ultra-Flexible Organic Electronics


          Stretchable and ultraflexible electronic devices have a broad range of potential uses, from robust devices for energy storage and conversion to biomedical devices that make conformal interfaces with the skin and internal organs. The authors in the February issue of MRS Bulletin have made key contributions to developing stretchable new materials or stretchable forms of old ones, new techniques for measuring the mechanical properties of fragile thin films, and new devices that exhibit unprecedented deformability. The talks in this webinar will expand on the topics presented in the journal.

          Talks:
           

          • Imperceptible Organic Electronics
          Martin Kaltenbrunner | Johannes Kepler University
             
            • Mechanical Properties of Low-Bandgap Organic Semiconductors
            Darren Lipomi | University of California, San Diego

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              Material Functionalities from Molecular Rigidity


              The January issue of MRS Bulletin provides an overview of the field of rigidity theory applied at the atomic scale, addressing the relationship between functionality and molecular rigidity. Basic phenomena associated with the onset of rigidity have been discovered, which has led to “smart glasses” with multiple functionalities and mechanical performances, for instance. Topological prediction and engineering of physical properties are enabling intelligent design of new disordered materials. Guidance from molecular rigidity is particularly helpful for developing improved and new functionality in the fields of glass science, civil engineering, electrical engineering, optoelectronics, and biology. The talks in this webinar expand on the articles presented in the MRS Bulletin issue.

              Talks:
               

              • Decoding the Glass Genome
              John Mauro | Corning Incorporated

                • Birth of Topological Phases in Network Glasses
                Punit Boolchand | University of Cincinnati

                  Speaker(s):

                  Ultrafast Laser Synthesis and Processing of Materials


                  Ultrafast laser-solid interactions have made a great deal of progress recently, especially in the understanding of atomistic mechanisms and dynamics controlling material response. The December issue of MRS Bulletin discusses the fundamental interactions at the shortest time scales for a wide range of applications, as well as other emerging opportunities of ultrafast laser synthesis and processing. This webinar will expand on the Bulletin with talks and interactive Q&A sessions with experts in the field.

                  Talks:
                   

                  • Ultrafast laser direct patterning for cell behavior control on biomedical implants
                  Hojeong Jeon | Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST)
                  • Formation of Advanced Metal Alloys via Ultrafast Laser-Driven Extreme States
                  Keegan Schrider | University of Michigan
                  • Femtosecond laser direct writing in transparent materials based on nonlinear absorption
                  Yongfeng Lu | University of Nebraska Lincoln

                  Speaker(s):

                  Metal-Organic Frameworks for Electronics and Photonics


                  Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have outgrown their traditional perception as being only porous molecular sponges to becoming a versatile platform for electronics and photonics applications. The November issue of MRS Bulletin highlights the state of the art of the rapidly growing field of MOFs applied to electronics and photonics, far beyond conventional gas storage and gas separation applications. Computational modeling of these structures will prove critical for guiding the rapid development of this field.

                  Talks:

                  Intrinsically Conducting MOFs
                  Deanna D’Alessandro | The University of Sydney

                  Guest@MOF: Achieving Emergent Properties for Electronic and Energy Conversion Device Applications
                  Alec Talin | Sandia National Laboratories

                  Speaker(s): Host(s): Speaker(s):

                  Metallic Materials for 3D Printing


                  Host(s): Speaker(s):

                  Incorporating Sustainability Principles into Your Research


                  Many materials researchers strive to contribute to technologies that are more “sustainable” than ones we use today. Often, these efforts focus on improving resource efficiency by creating materials and devices that are less energy, water, and material intensive. But for more sustainable technologies to be commercially viable and have a global impact, there are additional considerations, including raw material availability, product lifetime, social and economic dimensions, and how best to balance adverse short-term impacts with potential long-term gains. Instructors Tatiana Vakhitova and Alan Rae show how to incorporate sustainability principles into your research in a more comprehensive way while considering the real-world application of these principles to product design and manufacture. This webinar is aimed at materials researchers of all career stages, from students and postdocs to faculty and industry researchers.

                  Speaker(s):
                  Tags: career

                  Hierarchical MaterialsHierarchical Materials

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                  Hierarchical Materials


                  Materials with hierarchical structures represent a promising approach to enhance performance far beyond what can be achieved using composite structures, to add new functionalities and to adapt to special requirements. The September issue of MRS Bulletin, “Hierarchical materials,” provides an overview of aspects related to the analysis and development of hierarchical materials. Using biomaterials and multiscale modeling as starting point, the authors seek to enhance the performance and add new functionalities to hierarchical materials for lightweight structural and energy applications, catalysis, and machining of materials.

                  Speaker(s):
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