To view this presentation:

  • If you have an MRS account, click the Login button above.
  • New to MRS?  Create a free account here



  0       0

2014 MRS Spring Meeting


SS7.09 - S-Layer Morphogenesis


Apr 24, 2014 11:30am ‐ Apr 24, 2014 11:45am

Description

Crystalline bacterial cell surface layer (S-layer) proteins are one of the most abundant biopolymers on earth, and form the outermost cell envelope component in a broad range of bacteria and archaea. These S-layer protein lattices represent the simplest biological membranes developed during evolution. S-layer lattices are highly porous protein mesh works with unit cell sizes in the range of 3 to 30 nm, and thicknesses of ∼10 nm. But, one of the key features of S-layer proteins is their intrinsic capability to form self-assembled mono- or double layers in suspension, at solid supports, the air-water interface, planar lipid films, liposomes, nanocapsules, and nano particles.

S-layer proteins have attracted much attention in the literature recently since the reassembly process is entropy-driven and a fascinating example of matrix assembly following a multistage, non-classical pathway. While the formation of extended S-layer protein monolayers is usually in the focus of current research and developments in the life and non-life sciences, S-layer proteins are also able to form more uncommon morphologies (with respect to other biological model systems) such as tubes, ribbons, or extended sheets with a central screw dislocation. In addition, the formation of hollow S-layer protein cages allows to extend the morphogenetic potential of S-layer protein self-assembly into the third dimension.

This contribution summarizes the state-of-the art in the reassembly of S-layer proteins, with a special focus on the uncommon morphologies and the formation of closed three-dimensional S-layer architectures.

Acknowledgements:The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) (Agreement Awards FA9550-12-1-0274 and FA9550-10-1-0223), and the Erwin Schrödinger Society for Nanobiosciences, Vienna, Austria, funded part of this work.

Speaker(s):

  • Dietmar Pum, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences

You must be logged in and own this session in order to post comments.

Print Certificate
Review Answers
Print Transcript
Completed on: token-completed_on
Review Answers
Please select the appropriate credit type:
/
test_id: 
credits: 
completed on: 
rendered in: 
* - Indicates answer is required.
token-content

token-speaker-name
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
/
/
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content